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Posts Tagged ‘” “Nebraska’

UNL experts can help media make sense of the 2014 midterms

Monday, November 3rd, 2014

What do the 2014 midterm elections bode for the future? These University of Nebraska-Lincoln experts are available to help reporters analyze the rhetoric, campaign tactics and issues of the 2014 congressional and statehouse races, both in Nebraska and nationally.

John Hibbing, Foundation Regents University Professor of Political Science: Nebraska’s U.S. Senate, House races, statewide campaigns and campaign trail developments.  Hibbing is a nationally known expert in political psychology, biology and politics, political behavior, public opinion and legislative politics. His research has shown how people’s biology can influence their political orientation, an important perspective in a campaign season when Ebola fears came to the forefront. Reach Hibbing at 402-472-3220 or jhibbing1@unl.edu.

-  Kevin B. Smith, professor of political science, department chair: Nebraska’s U.S. Senate, House races, other major races, political messaging. Smith focuses on public policy, public administration, American politics, and biology and politics. He can discuss the dynamics of this year’s U.S. Senate race and other major races. He can analyze broad aspects of these campaigns, including the effectiveness or lack thereof of political advertising. He also can discuss differences between liberals, conservatives and moderates in the context of the 2014 election, and how developments on the campaign trail may be interpreted by these different groups of voters.  Smith, who is available Wednesday morning only, can be reached at 402-472-0779 or ksmith1@unl.edu.

-  Elizabeth Theiss-Morse, Willa Cather Professor of Political Science: Public opinion, political behavior, political psychology. Theiss-Morse researches Americans’ attitudes about numerous aspects of the American political system and about their fellow Americans.  Her research analyzes politicians’ use of heated rhetoric and how it affects the effectiveness of democracy. Reach Theiss-Morse at 402-472-3221 or etheissmorse1@unl.edu.

- Dona-Gene Barton, associate professor of political science: Public opinion, effects of campaign information on voters over time. Mitchell’s expertise is in American political behavior, public opinion and political psychology. She researches and teaches in the areas of how opinions are formed via information, campaigns and time, and the lifespan of information effects. She can discuss the effectiveness over time of campaign messaging on voters or how long unfavorable information may affect politicians and elected officials. Reach Barton at 402-472-5994 or dbarton4@unl.edu.

-  Damien Smith Pfister, Assistant Professor of Communication Studies: Political rhetoric, culture, digital media in politics. Pfister researches the impact of digital media on public deliberation and culture, including how blogging and social networking has challenged traditional patterns of communication during political campaigns and controversies. His new book, “Networked Media, Networked Rhetorics: Attention and Deliberation in the Early Blogosphere,” examines how political battles are fought in the digital world. Reach Pfister at 402-472-0646 or dpfister2@unl.edu.

- Sergio Wals, Assistant Professor of Political Science and Ethnic Studies: Political attitudes and behaviors, immigration and politics, the Latino vote.  Wals’ research agenda is centered on American political behavior, with a focus on topics related to race and ethnicity both in the United States and Latin America. He has paid particular attention to the study of political attitudes and behaviors of Latino immigrants to the U.S. He can comment on how the immigration issue affected the election, as well as on the Latino vote. Wals is best contacted via email, at swals2@unl.edu. His office number is 402-472-5704.

_ Aaron Duncan, Director, Speech & Debate, Lecturer, Communication Studies: Election outcomes and communication strategies in statewide races.  Duncan’s research focuses on popular culture and political communication. Reach Duncan via his cell phone, 402-450-7830, or aduncan3@unl.edu.

Expert Alert: Thoughts on the upcoming Oscars by film studies prof Wheeler Winston Dixon

Tuesday, February 11th, 2014

Wheeler Winston Dixon, Ryan Professor of Film Studies at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, is an internationally recognized scholar of film history, theory and criticism.

Here are a few of his thoughts about the 86th Annual Academy Awards, to air March 2 on ABC:

– “It continues to amaze me how few people understand that this isn’t some sort of national poll of either critics or audiences; it’s an industry event.”

– “Directing will go to Alfonso Cuarón for ‘Gravity,’ though Steve McQueen for ‘12 Years a Slave’ is a strong contender, and in my opinion should get the nod.”

– “Best Actor to Matthew McConaughey for ‘Dallas Buyers Club,’ but Bruce Dern is a strong favorite for ‘Nebraska,’ now that Robert Redford is out of the running. Best Actress to Cate Blanchett for ‘Blue Jasmine,’ which seems to me pretty much a lock.”

–  Other “locks:” “12 Years A Slave”‘ for Best Picture,  Best Supporting Actor to Jared Leto for “Dallas Buyers Club,”  Best Animated Feature to “Frozen.”

– To be taken with “a huge grain of salt:”  – Best Supporting Actress is a three-way toss-up between Jennifer Lawrence, “American Hustle;” Lupita Nyong’o, “12 Years A Slave;” and June Squibb, “Nebraska.”  Best Original Screenplay is too close to call, though “Nebraska”’s Bob Nelson has a decent shot.

– Thomas Vinterberg’s superb film “The Hunt” should win Best Foreign Language Film, though this category continues to rankle. “To pick simply one film to represent the entire world is really a suspect enterprise.”

For more details, visit Dixon’s “Frame By Frame” blog:

http://blog.unl.edu/dixon/2014/01/16/the-86th-annual-academy-awards/

To contact Dixon for an interview, reach him at 402.472-6064 or wdixon1@unl.edu