'Sunday Scientist' explores cold facts of climate change Aug. 21

Released on 08/10/2011, at 2:00 AM
Office of University Communications
University of Nebraska–Lincoln

WHEN: Sunday, Aug. 21, 2011

WHERE: NU State Museum, Morrill Hall, south of 14th and Vine Streets [map]

Lincoln, Neb., August 10th, 2011 —
Frank Rack, Associate Professor of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at UNL, and Executive Director of ANDRILL, in the field in Antarctica (Photo credit: ANDRILL Science Management Office)
Frank Rack, Associate Professor of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at UNL, and Executive Director of ANDRILL, in the field in Antarctica (Photo credit: ANDRILL Science Management Office)
David Harwood, Professor of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at UNL, and Research Director of ANDRILL in the field in Antarctica (Photo credit: ANDRILL Science Management Office)
David Harwood, Professor of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at UNL, and Research Director of ANDRILL in the field in Antarctica (Photo credit: ANDRILL Science Management Office)
ANDRILL drilling site in Antarctica (Photo credit: ANDRILL Science Management Office)
ANDRILL drilling site in Antarctica (Photo credit: ANDRILL Science Management Office)
"Sunday with a Scientist" logo

The University of Nebraska State Museum will host a Sunday with a Scientist program for children and families about climate change from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. Aug. 21 at Morrill Hall, south of 14th and Vine Streets on the University of Nebraska-Lincoln City Campus.

The program, "Drilling for Cold Facts," will be led by professors David Harwood and Frank Rack of the UNL Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences and the ANDRILL (ANtarctic geological DRILLing) Program.

The ANDRILL Program is an international team of scientists who study Antarctic geology to understand past and future climate change. Visitors will discover how scientists conduct deep drilling through the continent's ice and bedrock, recovering cores that yield important clues about climate history.

For more information about the UNL Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, visit http://eas.unl.edu. For more information on ANDRILL, visit www.andrill.org. Blog entries from the 2010 ANDRILL environmental and geophysical site surveys for the upcoming Coulman High Project are available at http://andrill.org/science/ch/news.

Sunday with a Scientist is a series of presentations that highlight the work of State Museum scientists and those from other UNL departments and institutions, while educating children and families on a variety of topics related to science and natural history. Presenters will share scientific information in a fun and informal way through demonstrations, activities, or by conducting their science on site. Sunday with a Scientist programs are 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. at Morrill Hall on the third Sunday of each month.

Upcoming Sunday with a Scientist topics: Sept. 18 -- Plants; Oct. 16 -- Fossils; Nov. 20 -- Viruses; Dec. 18 -- Minerals. For updates on the Sunday with a Scientist schedule through the year, visit www.museum.unl.edu.

Established in 1871, the University of Nebraska State Museum is celebrating its 140th anniversary with public events and educational programming throughout the year. Hours are 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-Wednesday and Friday-Saturday, 9:30 a.m.-8 p.m. Thursdays, and 1:30-4:30 p.m. Sundays. Admission is $5 for adults (19 and over), $3 for children (5-18 years, 4 and under are free), and $10 for families (up to two adults and children). UNL staff, faculty and students are admitted free with valid NU ID. There is an additional charge for planetarium shows. Parking is free.

WRITER: Dana Ludvik, Public Relations Coordinator, NU State Museum, (402) 472-3779